Frogs and Crocuses

I feel like we have begun to unfurl, like a fern, from the winter. The plants and wildlife have, too, with the frogs getting so amorous in three and foursomes that we’ve had to censor the site and just put one picture up of this more demure one.

Anyway we got some volunteers together (Ruth, Stacey, Jan, Kate and Zainab) to do some tidying, sowing and picking crocus flowers that had gone over to use for dyeing.

We also cut up a milk bottle to use for labels. One small victory over plastic.

Our first foray into SPRING. Hurrah!


Preparing for Autumn & Winter Growing

Preparing for Autumn & Winter Growing

Paul Richens, of the renowned Skip Garden led a workshop at Cordwainers looking at what we can grow at this time of year.  He gave us a fascinating talk which got us thinking about rainfall, light levels, temperature and local conditions – and the useful seasonal benchmark of Guy Fawkes night (5th November) as the real end of the growing season in London.  Still time to put in a crop of radishes.  Even then we can still grow microgreens and plants that will survive – or even thrive in – the winter. Brassicas mostly, winter lettuces and ‘oriental’ greens such as mizuna (if you like that mustardy heat).  We then went to the garden and took root and stem cuttings from mint and a scented pelargonium. _DSC0292

Mint is probably the easiest plant to take root or stem cuttings from.
You can take pelargonium cuttings easily. Cut the stem with sharp secateurs and place several of these cuttings in a mixture of John Innes 3 and some horticultural grit to help with drainage.


Pelargonium cutting
Water then make a greenhouse for your cuttings with a plastic bag. These should take root within a couple of weeks.




Draw What You See, Not What You Think You See.

Draw What You See, Not What You Think You See.

We ran another of our weed walks — or plant safaris — last week.  At these events we look at plant families, how plants grow, their habitats and the great variety and resilience of wild plants. After ambling about inspecting and wondering at the above, we then study the plants further by drawing them.

People get scared of drawing but drawing is the least of it.  The looking is the most of it.  And we want to encourage looking (and the wonder which comes from looking) at the intricacies and complexities of even the ‘simplest’ weed/wild flower.  You should probably spend 60% of your time looking – more than drawing.  If you do that, you are more likely to end up drawing what you actually see, rather than what you expect to see.

One tip Neela Basu, our tame artist, gave us for drawing is to examine the way and direction a plant grows and, rather than draw its face (or flower) first, start at the bottom near its roots and work our way up and try to express the way its energy propels it upwards or around.

Our group, with a wealth of knowledge about growing between them, had a head start with the looking  as they were familiar with the habits and patterns of plants.  They produced some fantastic drawings.

Thanks to Capital Growth for arranging it and to Steve Ellis for the photographs.

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The Blues

The Blues

Our annual woad and indigo harvest and dye workshop was an evening of gentle delight.  It involved curiosity, experiment and awe at that magical transformation of plant into colour.  We also harvested our flax and ate amazing scones with home-made jams.  Sometimes you can imagine that all is right with the world.

We did two pots – one of woad and one of Japanese indigo, which usually gives a stronger colour but we found the woad was just as potent this year.  Thanks to Steve for taking the photos.

Woad seeds.
Woad leaves steeped in hot water for about 40 minutes.
Japanese indigo steeping.
The liquid should be sherry-coloured (ph9). Then get oxygen into it until the bubbles turn blue.


Add Spectralite and leave till the liquid turns yellowy-green.
Get the temperature up to 50 degrees C.
Wait, talk, eat scones.
Fold, twist and block the fabric.


Fold, clip, twist or block the fabric.
Gently put the fabric in the vat, avoiding getting air into the liquid.
Leave the fabric for about 10 minutes. It should be fully submerged to avoid oxidisation. Easier said than done.


Carefully remove the fabric, avoiding drips. As it hits the air it will turn blue.


This is What Community Gardens Do…

This is What Community Gardens Do…

One of the things we hope and try to do at Cordwainers is to encourage and support other community growing spaces, so it was a pleasure to help in a small way a newly-revived garden down the road from us.  A handful of young residents have been turning up every week to make the garden a welcoming as well as productive place for other people local to the Frampton Park Estate.  We put up a few social media posts, provided sausages, seeds and plants and hoped somebody would turn up. Elsdale made amazing cakes, tea and a borrowed a barbecue from a cycling club – as well as supplying an eagerness and commitment to the cause: to get people growing together. Stephanie actually grabbed people off the street but others came voluntarily.  What was so impressive in a small but powerful way was that these actions – not huge in themselves (baking, talking, posting, shopping, sowing) –  did bring neighbours together, to eat, grow and talk. This is simply what community gardens do. I certainly left feeling better: I belonged somewhere, I’d talked to neighbours I hadn’t met before, I got my hands dirty, ate and drank nice things, sparked new ideas for new connections and projects and growing and tea-drinking.

Copy of Elsdale

Elsdale - Reuben
Our youngest gardener  sowed his first chilli seeds. Hopefully not his last. He also watered and got his hands dirty which is a great start.

And there should be more of this going on. So find a patch of ground, find your neighbours and grow.

A passing local encouraged to cross the threshold and get involved.


Carrier bag flower!

Everybody Needs Good Neighbours

Everybody Needs Good Neighbours

Sometimes, when we’re setting up a stall for a community event my heart sinks a little. The sky is grey and the wind is whipping round the marquee.  We have a long day ahead of us and we must be friendly and active and sometimes that seems too much.  But these are the times when you really need that human activity.  These are the times that will really lift you.

Some local organisations got together on Saturday at Mabley Green to coincide with a football competition at Hackney Wick FC.  Our stall neighbours included Children With Voices, Hackney Quest , Hackney Pirates  and ecoACTIVE– all creative and inspiring outfits which encourage children to be active, curious and inventive – to give them alternatives to the other stuff out there like gangs and slumping on the sofa.

As our contribution we set up to make willow crowns with plants picked from the garden – including ceanothus, ivy, broccoli flowers, dandelions, shepherd’s purse, geraniums, yarrow and red valerian – and seeing the wonderful variety in both the people and their creations lifted our spirits.

And if this video of Michelle talking about the event doesn’t lift your heart, you may need to seek a doctor: Jumping Beans