Carers’ Time Out

Carers’ Time Out

Now this is what the garden is for: respite from all your responsibilities, except plants.  Oh, and each other.

We’ve started, with City and Hackney Carers, a gardening course for unpaid carers.  The idea is to learn about gardening but, more importantly, to have a break in peaceful, undemanding surroundings.  Caring can be relentless; no matter how much you love the person you care for, it can wear you out and, I think, you sometimes feel you are suffering a version of the same affliction.  I feel, for example, I have had a stroke or some kind of brain storm since my mother had hers.  Anyway, gardening, as anyone knows who has been in a garden, is pretty much the solution to any problem and we want more people to feel that calm pleasure you get from being outside in nature – and it’s so nice to be able to share that peace with local carers.

We’ve been lucky with the weather and on our second session we potted up seedlings and made cuttings.

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Draw What You See, Not What You Think You See.

Draw What You See, Not What You Think You See.

We ran another of our weed walks — or plant safaris — last week.  At these events we look at plant families, how plants grow, their habitats and the great variety and resilience of wild plants. After ambling about inspecting and wondering at the above, we then study the plants further by drawing them.

People get scared of drawing but drawing is the least of it.  The looking is the most of it.  And we want to encourage looking (and the wonder which comes from looking) at the intricacies and complexities of even the ‘simplest’ weed/wild flower.  You should probably spend 60% of your time looking – more than drawing.  If you do that, you are more likely to end up drawing what you actually see, rather than what you expect to see.

One tip Neela Basu, our tame artist, gave us for drawing is to examine the way and direction a plant grows and, rather than draw its face (or flower) first, start at the bottom near its roots and work our way up and try to express the way its energy propels it upwards or around.

Our group, with a wealth of knowledge about growing between them, had a head start with the looking  as they were familiar with the habits and patterns of plants.  They produced some fantastic drawings.

Thanks to Capital Growth for arranging it and to Steve Ellis for the photographs.

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The Blues

The Blues

Our annual woad and indigo harvest and dye workshop was an evening of gentle delight.  It involved curiosity, experiment and awe at that magical transformation of plant into colour.  We also harvested our flax and ate amazing scones with home-made jams.  Sometimes you can imagine that all is right with the world.

We did two pots – one of woad and one of Japanese indigo, which usually gives a stronger colour but we found the woad was just as potent this year.  Thanks to Steve for taking the photos.

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Woad seeds.
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Woad leaves steeped in hot water for about 40 minutes.
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Japanese indigo steeping.
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The liquid should be sherry-coloured (ph9). Then get oxygen into it until the bubbles turn blue.

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Add Spectralite and leave till the liquid turns yellowy-green.
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Get the temperature up to 50 degrees C.
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Wait, talk, eat scones.
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Fold, twist and block the fabric.

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Fold, clip, twist or block the fabric.
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Gently put the fabric in the vat, avoiding getting air into the liquid.
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Leave the fabric for about 10 minutes. It should be fully submerged to avoid oxidisation. Easier said than done.

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Carefully remove the fabric, avoiding drips. As it hits the air it will turn blue.

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Water Melons? In London? 

Water Melons? In London? 

We like to try things out in the garden.  We’ve had a go at crops for fibre and grain: flax and wheat grew well and an ancient type of barley, bere, was successful – though was then eaten by mice.  We’ve also sown nuts and legumes from the grocer; the walnut and pistachio trees are doing well and we got a tiny handful of chick peas this year originally from a pack of dried ones.  They shrink to nothing – and are too precious to eat anyway. We grow Asian herbs and leaves such as shiso, pineapple sage and tree spinach – and coriander, of course.  We’ve also had some success with sweet potato.

We’ve had failures.  I’ve never managed to get saffron crocuses going and the ginger I tried rotted, the tea seed never germinated and every year I failed to grow melons.  I’d sow them in the richest soil in the most sheltered spot and they always defy me.

This spring I found an old packet of water melon seeds from Lidl.  There were 2 left in the packet so like Jack (of the beanstalk)’s mother, I just chucked them onto some soil without much hope of riches.  This is how it went. 2016-08-07-17-38-39-1

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‘Weed’ Walk in Weston Walk

‘Weed’ Walk in Weston Walk
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Willowherb
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Common mouse-ear and procumbent pearlwort.
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Buddleia, which seems to survive on air.

It’s long been my ambition to make a record of all the ‘weeds’ growing along Mare St.  I say ‘weeds’ but really I want to rehabilitate them and rename them as wild plants.  Finally we got round to it.  We roped Annie Chipchase, a local urban ecologist, in to lead a group of us to look at, identify and draw what we found.  We started at a short stretch of unprepossessing road round the corner from the garden: Weston Walk.  It’s more of an alley — often strewn with hair from the salon that backs onto it, as well as chicken bones from the chicken shop, dumped rubbish bags and occasionally furniture.  I’d noticed, though, that a leaking pipe had provided an environment for moss to grow so I thought it would be a good place to begin our hunt.  In this short road we found 23 varieties of plants growing in the cracks and up the walls.  We were so absorbed, we hardly had time to explore or record what was growing on Mare St.  We wondered at the resilience of these plants growing in the most hostile environment – and will never look at the cracks in the pavement in the same way again.  L1020567L1020576L1020573

Drawing of pellitory of the wall.
Drawing of pellitory of the wall.
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Herb Robert
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Meadow grass
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Willowherb.

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Buddleia
Buddleia
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Speedwell.
Shepherd's Purse
Shepherd’s Purse

Incredible Edible – Not this frog though.

Incredible Edible – Not this frog though.

Visitors from afar…. well outside London.  Bicester, Oxfordshire to be exact.  Azul, Jason, Kate, Mark and Claudia from Grassroots Bicester and Banbury Community Action were on an awayday to find out about setting up a community growing space.  We talked about what Cordwainers has done (and some of the mistakes), did a tour of the garden, spent a lots of time watching the frogs, drank tea and ate cake (of course) and did a quick bundle dye session – a great way to get people interested in plants and growing. In return I found out about their projects which include community orchards and setting up Incredible Edible Bicester – making community-grown fruit and veg available to ANYone who wants it, based on this excellent principle started by Incredible Edible Todmorden – and Jason gave our fruit trees an overdue prune.

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Dyeing al fresco is the best way.
Some tried and tested dye plants – crocus, marigold, hollyhock, onion skins – and experimenting with chard stalks.
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Claudia, Kate, Mark, Jason and Azul with their flower-dyed pocket squares.

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Jason pruned the cherry so that we can reach the fruit and so that it’s growth is more balanced.
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Mulching with compost keeps weeds down, moisture in and provides nourishment.

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Pollination in action. Thanks, bee, for future plums.