Everybody Needs Good Neighbours

Everybody Needs Good Neighbours

Sometimes, when we’re setting up a stall for a community event my heart sinks a little. The sky is grey and the wind is whipping round the marquee.  We have a long day ahead of us and we must be friendly and active and sometimes that seems too much.  But these are the times when you really need that human activity.  These are the times that will really lift you.

Some local organisations got together on Saturday at Mabley Green to coincide with a football competition at Hackney Wick FC.  Our stall neighbours included Children With Voices, Hackney Quest , Hackney Pirates  and ecoACTIVE– all creative and inspiring outfits which encourage children to be active, curious and inventive – to give them alternatives to the other stuff out there like gangs and slumping on the sofa.

As our contribution we set up to make willow crowns with plants picked from the garden – including ceanothus, ivy, broccoli flowers, dandelions, shepherd’s purse, geraniums, yarrow and red valerian – and seeing the wonderful variety in both the people and their creations lifted our spirits.

And if this video of Michelle talking about the event doesn’t lift your heart, you may need to seek a doctor: Jumping Beans

Incredible Edible – Not this frog though.

Incredible Edible – Not this frog though.

Visitors from afar…. well outside London.  Bicester, Oxfordshire to be exact.  Azul, Jason, Kate, Mark and Claudia from Grassroots Bicester and Banbury Community Action were on an awayday to find out about setting up a community growing space.  We talked about what Cordwainers has done (and some of the mistakes), did a tour of the garden, spent a lots of time watching the frogs, drank tea and ate cake (of course) and did a quick bundle dye session – a great way to get people interested in plants and growing. In return I found out about their projects which include community orchards and setting up Incredible Edible Bicester – making community-grown fruit and veg available to ANYone who wants it, based on this excellent principle started by Incredible Edible Todmorden – and Jason gave our fruit trees an overdue prune.

L1020523

 

L1020525
Dyeing al fresco is the best way.
Some tried and tested dye plants – crocus, marigold, hollyhock, onion skins – and experimenting with chard stalks.
L1020536
Claudia, Kate, Mark, Jason and Azul with their flower-dyed pocket squares.

IMG_2217[1]
Jason pruned the cherry so that we can reach the fruit and so that it’s growth is more balanced.
IMG_2219[1]
Mulching with compost keeps weeds down, moisture in and provides nourishment.

L1020540
Pollination in action. Thanks, bee, for future plums.

Tea at Morningside – Guest Blog by Jillian Wieda

I’m Jillian Wieda, a Master’s of Psychology student at University of Westminster, originally from California. I’ve been in the U.K. just over a year and hope to stay longer to train as a therapist or psychologist. Volunteering with Cordwainers Grow is an amazing opportunity to commune with the natural world, learn new skills and meet amazing people. I hope one day soon to grow organic produce of my own!

Enjoying a warm, delicious cup of tea with biscuits is such a treat for many of us. Now imagine drinking a healthy cup of tea that you grew and assembled yourself, using all of your favorite herbs! Cordwainers Grow, in partnership with Sanctuary Housing, recently presented the workshop: Growing Herbal Tea on your Balcony. It was great fun and a group of young children from the community joined our volunteers to give it a go!

This workshop is part of a free series called Herbs in the Home offered at the Morningside Community Centre in Hackney.

Some upcoming fall workshops include; Creating herbal remedies and a First Aid Kit (September 25), Making Body and Home Cleaning Products (October 23) and Making Anti-Bug Herbal Moth Balls (November 20).

The herbal tea workshop started with clipping a few fresh herbs, like rosemary and sage, from the Morningside Community Centre’s own garden. We then learned (as I’m a volunteer as well) how to clip segments of the plants and replant them in small pots. These small, potted herb gardens can grow on balconies and window sills to provide fresh herbs for tea and cooking.

The next step was to create our own customized tea bags from a variety of dried herbs. The children used their sense of smell to select from chamomile, echinacea, lemon balm, lemon verbena, lavender and nettle. The volunteers also shared some of the natural healing qualities, historically linked with the herbs. Some children added hot water to their creations and sipped on them right away, while others crafted ingredient labels and were off to give them to their families.

Corwainers Grow would love for more community members to join us for free fun and education, so please spread the good word!

   

Rosemary is easy to take cuttings from.
Rosemary is easy to take cuttings from.
Making cuttings from sage
Making cuttings from sage
Rosemary cuttings
Rosemary cuttings
Protect the cuttings and keep moisture in with plastic bags
Protect the cuttings and keep moisture in with plastic bags
Choosing herb mixtures to make tea.
Choosing herb mixtures to make tea.
Making brews.
Making brews.
Herbal teabag personally mixed.
Herbal teabag personally mixed.

 

The Woad Factor

The Woad Factor

If you’ve never witnessed the magic of a woad (or indigo) vat, seen the alchemy of one thing turning into another, book yourself a place on a workshop now.  Forget the wow factor, the woad factor will bowl you over. The nearest thing I could think of in twenty-first century terms is the awe we felt the first time you see an iphone swipe. That wonder soon wears off. Never with woad.

We set up an informal workshop at Cordwainers Garden to experiment with our woad harvest and went through the exacting (but not difficult) process of turning a handful of leaves into a permanent dye. It took about three hours in all. We had a great turnout of people from all corners of the world.  People from Uruguay, Argentina, Spain, Leicester, and Wembley came to have a go and help us with the magic.

Woad leaves collected then torn up.
We collected and weighed our woad leaves then tore them up. 
The process we followed.
The process we followed.
Boiling water poured over the leaves.
We poured boiling water from our storm kettle (no electricity) over the leaves.
The leaves steep for about an hour.
The leaves steep for about an hour.
We squeezed (and kept) the leaves to use again.
We squeezed (and kept) the leaves to use again.
We then aerated the water until the bubbles turned blue.
We then added soda ash and aerated the water until the bubbles turned blue.
We then heated it to 50 degrees and left for about 20 minutes.
We then heated it to 50 degrees and left for about 20 minutes.
Folding and twisting our material.
Preparing the material to be dyed.
After adding spectralite to remove the oxygen we carefully added our dyestuff.
After adding spectralite to remove the oxygen we carefully added our dyestuff.  The liquid is greeny yellow and the material doesn’t seem to have taken on any colour when you look at it in the water.
The magic happens as the material hits the air.
The magic happens as the material hits the air.
It takes on more colour.
It takes on more colour.

052

It zings
It zings

060063

.

We Grew a Garment!

We Grew a Garment!

We didn’t really think it through before embarking on a project to grow a piece of clothing entirely in London.  If we had thought it through, we might not have started as it was a year-long labour of love and faith.  But we were inspired by the idea of the threads that bind us together in the city.  We wanted to show, through a piece of material, that individually we can come together to make something that we can’t do on our own.

Until the introduction of cotton and the industrial revolution, linen production was widespread in Britain and Ireland.  Indeed, it was the first textile crop grown by man – 10,000 or so years ago. Its peak here was probably in the 17th and 18th centuries. People would have grown it for their own needs and it was also raised and processed on a large scale.  But it takes a lot of work – and expertise.  All those centuries of flax production being commonplace and domestic made everyone an expert – or at least aware of the plant and its uses.  No longer. We had to start from the beginning.  We had to learn about the plant’s many properties and work out ideal growing conditions, to dew or water ret, the best way of heckling, do we need a distaff for spinning?  What is a distaff? Would this toy giraffe do?

We made mistakes and wasted a lot of time and flax getting it wrong and lost people and plants on the way, but we had some great days.   A memorable one was sowing a patch next to the River Lea in Hackney.  On a sunny morning we met river dwellers and land lubbers who spoke to each other about common concerns.  We talked over cups of tea to small children, dog walkers, curious passers-by and the odd loiterer.  Already the flax was bringing us together.

And the school workshops were full of excitement and energy – as well as learning.  We worked with five Hackney and Tower Hamlets primary schools (300+ noisy children!) thanks to the local school gardener’s (Cassie Liversidge’s) own enthusiasm.  They rippled, retted, broke, scutched, heckled and even spun the flax.  If nothing else, they learned that thread comes from plants and takes a lot of effort. They fitted flax production into their lessons – from science to the Iron Age. Cassie said it was a “fantastic ‘living history’ lesson for the pupils and they have loved to be involved in it”.

This project brought a huge number of (sometimes surprising) people together – from those children in London to Hebrew Bible publishers in Jerusalem and a weaver in Crete.  In between were community gardens, housing estates, city farms, Children’s Centres, Permaculturalists, fashion students, knitters, weavers and, thanks to the Guild of Spinners, Weavers and Dyers and Twitter, two spinners (Christine Rowe and Aaron Fletcher) who were willing to learn about the demands of turning hanks of hair-like fibre into thread.

Throughout the project we were tugged back into our pasts and our fairy tale memories – from the ancient boredom and sociability of harvesting, to gazing at the huge pile of flax straw and wishing Rumpelstiltskin was nearby.  Similarly, there was a fairy tale quality to our own spinning.  It didn’t matter how much we processed, our pile of thread never seemed to grow any bigger.  But eventually we handed our yarn (about 400g) over to knitters at the London College of Fashion.  They made a top designed to bring out the great variability of the thread – made by so many people.

But it wasn’t really about the final product; it was about the threads that bind us.

If you’d like to find out more, or to take part in our slightly less ambitious project this year – to grow string – email kate@cordwainersgrow.org.uk

Ryan Saradjola, photographer, Quentin Hubert, stylist and Ka Hei Law, hair and make-up artist.
Ryan Saradjola, photographer, Quentin Hubert, stylist and Ka Hei Law, hair and make-up artist.
Preparing to sow at Gascoyne Estate, Hackney
Preparing to sow at Gascoyne Estate, Hackney
Grace with her harvest at Rosendale Allotments
Grace with her harvest at Rosendale Allotments
Zoe Burt introducing the project.
Zoe Burt introducing the project.
This diagram shows some of the connections we made during the project.
This diagram shows some of the connections we made during the project.
Helpers at Morningside School, Hackney.
Helpers at Morningside School, Hackney.
Workshop at the London College of Fashion
Workshop at the London College of Fashion
Drill spinning
Using a hand drill to spin – at Cordwainers Garden

Mid Winter Flaxifying

In that no-man’s-land between Christmas and New Year, we managed to winkle a good handful of people from the warmth of their homes into the cold mid-winter to try to reduce our still large pile of flax to thread (where IS Rumplestiltskin when you need him?).  Two people, Moira and Catherine, came from afar (Woking and somewhere further than Richmond) in spite of the bus strike.  Moira is now an expert as she’s been to three workshops and is even starting to develop her own tools.  Catherine was a novice but keen to learn about natural fibre and dyes.  We were also very happy to see Charlotte and Doug (formerly of this parish) who’ve been working on organic farms in Britain and Spain.

It was cold but bright and we spun 56 metres – mostly using the hand drill method.  Doug made a lovely fire (don’t tell) and we drank lots of tea and HopCord, the beer made by the People’s Park Tavern with our hops.  Yum.

L1020191 L1020192 L1020188 L1020184 L1020183 L1020181